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DonaldThu Jan-16-03 11:09 PM

  
"Rim laceing for the beginner"


  

          

Recently got a great deal on allow rim and stainless spoke kit for my 70 Norton. I also bought a new hub so I could use the old one for an example. I never did this before but I would like to try to lace and true it myself. I would use the forks in leiu of a wheel stand and either a dial indicator or as a old timer suggested, a length of solder twisted around the fork to use as an indicator. My question, does anyone know of a book, or some internet page that would explain how to do, step by step. Or can anyone help and explain. How tight should they be etc.etc. Thanks for your help

  

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RohanFri Jan-17-03 03:30 AM

  
#1. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Spoke tension is easy to check. Just tap on the spokes on your good wheel with a thin screwdriver - they should go "ting". In fact, all 40 of them should go the same sounding "ting".
Clink, clonk or thud is not acceptable !!!

Now, lacing them up is not so hard either. Is the rim already drilled to suit your Norton ? This is the hard bit, if not already done, since the holes/nipples have to face about precisely the right direction. Watch that the rim may not be symmetrical, since the hole drilling can be subtley different. All the holes in the rim should exactly face the hole in the hub they are to serve.

Thread the spokes through that have to go in from the outside, face them in the right direction to meet their hole, and very lightly thread the nipple on. Feed all the spokes through that go in from the inside, and jiggle the hub around until they all match up with their holes, and start the nipples on them. They should all be equidistant and circular, with no odd ones out, or any going the wrong way.

Lightly tighten up all the nipples, and check that the rim is centered on your hub - with the same offset as your laced wheel. It should be, if they sold you the right bits and they are all in the right place.

Theoretically, tightening all the spokes up evenly should give a correctly laced correctly tensioned wheel. In practice, this rarely happens, and you may need to chase the runout. I'll let someone else describe this - I found it can be easy or hard to get this right. (I'll admit I take it to a wheel builder at this stage, front wheels need to be perfect).

Watch that when you are done there should be no spoke protruding from any off the nipples - this will cause a puncture, very nasty. Cut off or grind off any protrusions. And use the rubber rim band, to protect the tube from the nipples...

There is a website that shows some of this, anyone know where it is ?. But doesn't take too long to figure it out anyway, there is only one way it can all go together. It may need to be retensioned several times, as the spokes settle down. Watch out that there is room to tension the spokes a little and the spoke will still not protrude from the nipple, since re-tensioning may be done with a tire already fitted.

hopethushelps, a little.

  

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BrithitFri Jan-17-03 10:59 AM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#2. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri Jan-17-03 11:01 AM by Brithit

  

          

A couple of things I would add: I like a very small amount of anti-seize compound on the new spoke threads. Although a pain to apply, I think when you get to the final tightening, it makes the nipples turn smoother. Also, if you have to grind off any protruding spokes, be careful to only trim the spoke, and not nick the rim itself. They like to rust when you do that. (chrome ones, which yours is not) I've built a very simple wheel stand out of two by tens, that basically is a flat base with two upright legs. At the top of the legs are v-shaped notches that hold the axle. When you are working with wood, any type of pointer can be attached. I used an L shaped piece of stout wire that is attached and held tight by a thumb screw. The thumb screw screws into a small threaded insert and holds the pointer tight. All cheap hardware store items. Construction sites for new homes are a good place to find two by scraps. You have to move the pointer around quite a bit as your rim takes shape and becomes closer to spec, so I think that arrangement will serve you better than solder. It's a fun job to do, don't be afraid of it.

  

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rratwintWed Jan-29-03 10:45 AM

  
#3. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Don't forget the offset on the front wheel.

  

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T LangTue Sep-08-09 09:20 PM
Member since Sep 07th 2009
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#7. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 3


          

>Don't forget the offset on the front wheel.

What offset? Does this apply to the rear as well? I have another post related to my 1970 Commando s that pulls left (since I purchased in 1974). The rear had obviously been re-laced, maybe front as well. I have never checked for offset.


  

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1970SMon Feb-03-03 09:00 AM

  
#4. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I too was suprised at how easy it was to re-lace a wheel (Rear drum). I had a local shop owner doubble check mine on his truing stand after I was finished. It took no time at all and helped my peace of mind.

Erich

  

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DARREN JEFFERYThu Mar-06-03 05:30 AM

  
#5. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

I re-lace my own and have the shop true them in. I just rebuilt a set of commando wheels with 18" rims and s/s spokes. The front disc wheel has 4 different spoke angles (4x10) and my kind supplier neglected to lable them, what a bugger that was sorting things out. SUCCESS IN THE END THOUGH.

  

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FranWed Aug-26-09 03:20 PM
Member since Aug 20th 2009
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#6. "RE: Rim laceing for the beginner"
In response to Reply # 5


          

I am looking for a diagram to relace my Kawasaki Vulcan front wheel. Can anyone help?

  

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