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Alan hSun Jul-10-05 10:58 AM

  
"Tires"


  

          

Any comments appreciated on running An Avon roadrunner
on the rear of my 75 850 with an existing dunlop k81 Roadmaster on the front for general all around riding. I would like to switch to Avons but only need a rear tire. I only get about 2500 miles out of the Dunlops which I understand is common. Thanks
alan

  

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JeffTue Jul-12-05 08:46 AM

  
#1. "RE: Tires"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

A friend has Avon's on his Bonneville (18" rear 19" front) and I was very impressed with the sticky tires, and the traction in corners. I have ordered Avon Venom's ($131) for my Commando, using the same size 19" for front and rear.

The dealer told me the Commando's came with matching Dunlops, same tire front & rear. (I would think that you would not get the full benefit mounting just the rear) anyway good luck with your bike!

Jeff

  

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MichaelBTue Jul-12-05 03:28 PM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#2. "RE: Tires"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

After 18 yrs. of Norton abstencia I purchased a very used Mark III, it had a good K81 on the front and worn Super Venom on the rear. The bike handled terrible.
The head shook, I wasn't confident leaning it over.
I replaced the rear with a low cost Bridgstone, similar in profile to the K81. Better, but not confidence inspiring. Adjusted the Isolastics, checked the head bearings / swing arm, replaced worn out Girlings with Koni's, serviced the front forks. Better still ,but the bike did not track right and was squirrelly.
Then I had the wheels professionally tuned, trued and offsets corrected and 'Matching' Super Venoms installed. WOW. This was the single biggest improvement made. A bike that was a little nerve wracking to ride became settled, tracked straight would corner and brake hard with confidence.
My only concern was it seemed to push a little wide in turns. I got used to it and was so happy I branded K81's as junk. I sold that bike and the new owner loves it. (I kept the Koni's)
I since have acquired a well sorted 74 850 with 'Matching' K81's that work quite well. The bike tracks straight, holds a line straight and turns in easily. (Doesn't push)

The story here is a motorcycle is only as good as the sum of it's parts. Both K81's and Super Venoms are good tires and I believe should be run as matched sets. Anything can be done, just don't loose sight of the whole picture.

"You pays your money, and takes your chances."

Mike

  

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JeffThu Jul-14-05 10:39 AM

  
#3. "RE: Tires"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Mike, I purchased a very used 72 750 Commando in San Antonio. Bike is a "basket case rebuild" that is now running well. I test rode the bike, and it ran great but the handling was terrifying, the forks and brakes were gone.

I have completely rebuilt the forks now (had to replace both lower fork tubes and all fork bushings), so now I have forks & brake. The bike feels really "loose" at tollway speeds, so I am taking it in for specialist work (front and rear isolastic shims)

The tires (sorry I digress) are really dry looking Bridgestones. Called this morning, my Avon Venoms are in. After I mount the tires, I am riding across town for the isolastic work. Also, it was recommended to me to change the shocks. I currently have RJB's, but I am told that when I sit on the bike it is almost bottoming out. Planning to mount Hagon's along same time as isolastic work.

will let ya know
(the idea is to just get the bike running and handling well for the season, probably tear it down over the winter)

  

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MichaelBThu Jul-14-05 05:15 PM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#4. "RE: Tires"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Jeff,
Funny how Norton's have the reputation for being fine handlers, however improperly set up, they are a hand full. When I got back into Norton's I was beginning to think I was looking back with 'Rose colored glasses' because mine was definitely a hand full. I now have several and properly set up, they bring alot of joy.

Your on the right track. A couple more items, recheck all engine mountings, the swing arm pivot and the cush drive in the rear hub.
My prediction is you'll have one sweet bike and your going to love those Avon's.

Good luck and keep us informed.

Mike

  

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MichaelBThu Jul-14-05 05:37 PM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#5. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Jeff,

I just wanted to comment on Hagons. I just pulled the Hagons off my 74 and installed the Konis. Oh yeh, better. That doesn't mean the Hagons are bad, I prefer the Konis. I know, I know Konis aren't available.

The Hagons look the part and are very close to the original Girlings, but I never liked the Girlings. Heresy I am sure, but I felt they were to springy, need more dampening. The same with the Hagons. I haven't tried any other shocks so I can't recommend any, but I know people who like Progressive.
Works Performance 'Street Strokers' are ones I would consider with their dual rate springs.

Hagons definitely have the look and are O.K. But when I get a chance/excuse I will be ordering up a set of Works Performance matched to my weight.
210lbs.

Mike

  

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JeffFri Jul-15-05 10:12 AM

  
#6. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

wrt: Hagon shocks

In my last project I used Falcon shocks (have not found
any for Commando) and they said the "rule of thumb" is
you should use 25% of the shock travel by just "sitting"
on the bike. That is the starting point, tune from there.

On this Command (current shocks are NJB's) It just feels soft,
a friend I was riding with says the bike almost bottoms
out the suspension sometimes. That is part of my "loose handling"
problem, for sure. I found the Hagons, with external spring for
Norton at $172. I have seen the "Ikon" shocks in Classic
Bike, but want to avoid international if possible (cost).

Also on the Norton the shocks are leaned way forward. I think
shocks are less efficient the more they lean in. But I do
not remember Dad's 850 MKIII being soft or loose handling.
Course that was some years ago,

thanks! Jeff

  

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dynodaveyFri Jul-15-05 01:21 PM

  
#7. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

IIRC, from viewing the hagon site I thought there are 3 possibly 4 different rates of shock dampening, in addition to several spring rates offered.
Picking the right combination can be a challange.
Passing judgement on a "hagon" shock/spring or comparing to a koni without knowing the specs would seem to be less than fulfilling.

anyone have a "shock dyno"?

shock dynoless dave

  

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janTue Jul-19-05 02:45 AM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#8. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 7


  

          

I tought my ass was a shock dyno !

  

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Ian WilsonTue Jul-19-05 05:39 AM

  
#9. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 8


  

          

Guys,

If you get hold of Hagon's in the UK themselves (they don't bite and are very much still in business!) they not only have an application list for just about any bike you like, but if you give them all the relevant details about you (weight, two-up riding, style of your riding, speed of your riding, etc,) they will put together the right shock for you on your bike. No more guesswork!

Good news is, it costs no more! And they do worldwide mailing.

They also do shocks for modern bikes too, if anybody has any of those things.

Let me know if you can't find the contact details and I'll post it on here.

HTH,

Ian

  

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JeffTue Jul-19-05 09:34 AM

  
#10. "RE: Hagon's"
In response to Reply # 9


  

          

Serrano's Motorsports in Tempe AZ has a "spring dyno" and some test equipment, Carlos is very involved in vintage motocross and does excellent work on forks.

Here is the letter I sent to Hagon's (lets see what they say, I dont know if the difference in cost justifies the custom setup). I suspect your humble Norton rider would benefit more by missing a meal than paying $500 for lightweight alloy shocks--

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2005 9:26 AM
To: [email protected]'
Subject: 72 Norton shocks

Greetings, I have a 72 Commando that has weak shocks. A friend I was riding with told me the suspension is almost bottomed out, and recommended Hagon's.

Your application chart lists the p.n. 33002 for this. Is this the best spring rate and shock dampening for my bike? Some details:

Bike weight 395 lb.

Rider weight 200 lb.

Two up riding (occasionally)

Style of riding: aggressive (loud 4-speed Norton)

Speed of riding: usually 10-20 mph above speed limit

  

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