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Ian WilsonFri May-27-05 03:33 AM

  
"Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."


  

          

Hi guys, advice from the experts please!

I've acquired a three-phase power box made by a firm called Wassell which I'm assured is pretty much the same as a Boyer. The guy I got it from has one on his 1970 Bonneville and reckons it is excellent.

I have a Mk3 Commando and I want to fit it to that because the sort of riding I do is low engine speed touring stuff (I have a big g/box sprocket!) and the charging system is marginal to say the least.

However, the instructions show how to fit it but to a three-wire alternator. My Commando has a two-wire alternator.

So, the question! Can I fit this to my Commando? Which wires go where? Do I need a new alternator? Would a genuine Boyer have the same problem? The Boyer brochure suggests that a single phase is right for the bike, but I now have a three-phase device.....

Three-phase certainly seems the way to go and I hope I can use this box.

Thanks in advance.

Ian

  

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MichaelBFri May-27-05 08:27 AM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#1. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Yes, you need a 3 phase alternator. Maybe the power box can be modified to run on single phase, I don't know, but what would be the point?

I'm curious to know what your buddy did on the T120.

Mike

  

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geo46erFri May-27-05 09:06 AM
Member since Mar 18th 2009
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#2. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Hi Ian,
The box you have is probably a six diode rectifier/regulator just like 90% of the Jap bikes out there. You probably could hook up just two stator wires to it, but, then you still are running single phase and as Michael B. points out "what's the point".
The three phase stators are readily available and not too terribly expensive or difficult to install, go for it.

justa thought,
G.B.

G.B.

  

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Ian WilsonMon May-30-05 12:29 AM

  
#3. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

OK guys, I'll go for it! I'll buy a three-phase (and three wire) alternator. As you say, they're not so expensive and my one is 30 years old after all!

What I'm trying to do is improve generator output below 4000 rpm. If I remember back to school days, (a long while ago) then 3-phase would do this. I think. Does anybody out there know if I'm right? If not, then why go 3-phase at all? Why would anybody have ever made a 3-phase power box in the first place?



Incidentally, my buddy on the Bonneville now admits to running a 2-wire or single phase box. It has been good though...

  

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dynodaveyTue May-31-05 06:54 AM

  
#4. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Yes more power down at low RPM's

The improvement over the single phase 180w is not as dramatic as this chart but is still real.

  

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Ian WilsonTue Jun-07-05 11:10 AM

  
#5. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Hi guys.

Bought and fitted Lucas 3-phase 3-wire stator and 3-phase regulator/rectifier assembly.

Easy job, only five electricsl connections.

Headlamp on, previously charge didn't balance drain at 5,500 rpm. Now it balances at 3,500. Problem solved!

Anybody else having a charging problem my experience suggests that 3-phase is the way to go. Don't forget though that it is still 180w!

Thanks to all for your suggestions.

Ian Wilson

  

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MichaelBTue Jun-07-05 02:53 PM
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#6. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

Ian, Thanks for the update. I have been thinking of doing this myself.
Just curious, did you use the former power box, or a Lucas regulator with the existing diodes?

Mike

  

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Ian WilsonWed Jun-08-05 09:33 AM

  
#7. "RE: Three-phase, Power Boxes, etc."
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

I used a new three-phase power box made by a company called Wassell. They also do them in single phase.

From what I can make of it, it is the same as the Boyer Power Box in each case, with one exception. The Wassell unit has no emergency start capacitor, the Boyer does. This means that a sub-9v battery means no sparks with a Boyer ignition but for points you will still have them. The leaflet with it states that Wassell deliberately did not install a capacitor because they have a limited life (although probably years, in truth) and the Wassell power box is designed for a lifetime of the vehicle. Nothing to do with it being cheaper then.....

Of course, what we're trying to achieve here is better charging, so you shouldn't get a flat battery in the first place.

You remove the selenium rectifier and the Zeners; all this is contained in the power box. Actually I disconnected them but left them in place. Timidity I suppose.

So far so good; I'm very pleased. Headlamp on and battery not gradually running down any more! Charging (lights off) at 1,500 rpm! Amazing.

HTH,

Ian

  

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